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A Cock Doodle Dont English Literature Essay

When you hear the word "cock" the vital thing that involves head isn't usually a tale about the hazards of flattery; however if you resided in Geoffrey Chaucer's times you would recognize this to be always a tale direct out of his publication, The Canterbury Tales. This particular story in his book was "The Nun's Priest's Tale", fittingly told by way of a priest, a clergyman. He gives us a beast tale where we observe Chanticleer the cock's misfortunes scheduled to a blatant disregard of his dreams and a compromising situation he gets himself into credited to falling victim to flattery. Through Chanticleer's blunders Chaucer gives us overtones of a theme of human anguish.

To illustrate a graphic of human anguish, Chaucer first presents us to our main characters, the cock Chanticleer and the hen Pertelote. The tale begins on a sour note, even as start off experiencing the horrifying screams and cries of Chanticleer, the most prized rooster in the garden and the main source of eye chocolate to the hens there. Hoping to find out what ailed him, Pertelote, Chanticleers most favorite hen in the backyard, rushes to his aspect to learn that he had suffered from a problem. In his own words, "I dreamt that roaming along some time / In your yard I found a kind of beast, / A sort of hound that tried out or seemed at least / To try and seize me could have killed me inactive! / His color was a mixture of yellow and red, / His ears and tail were tipped

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with sable hair / Unlike the rest; he was a russet cur. " (Chaucer, 216). Evidently such a desire can be an omen to Chanticleer and foreshadows approaching events for us, however Pertelote was outraged that Chanticleer, the epitome of all a cock should be, would land sufferer to such a trivial subject. She berates our story's poor roster for such a display of cowardice and appearing so feeble before her; she reviews saying that dreams are only due to physical condition. Chanticleer however tries to influence Pertelote otherwise giving her experiences of men who experienced used heed of the concept their dreams conveyed and in some instances such observance preserved their lives. However, struggling to agree on who is right, they both decide to actually "hit the hay" that evening. Later in the month of May Chanticleer's desire finally becomes certainty when all of a sudden "A coal-tipped fox of sly iniquity / That were lurking round the groove for three / Long years, that very nighttime burst through and passed / Stockade and hedge, as Providence forecast, / In to the garden where Chanticleer the Good / Was wont, with all his girls, to repair. " (Chaucer, 225). Chanticleers goal had finally had finally swept up to him as the fox he envisioned early was now right in front of him! Experienced Chanticleer kept in mind and took be aware of his aspiration he'd have been kept the results of reaching the fox. Had that been the case though this particular tale would not have a style of human hurting for Chanticleer did not give thought to his dream and instead laid in the mouth of the fox minutes later thinking that he was safe in his occurrence.

To further add insult to the accident of human hurting, Chaucer even threw in another component into his tale. This component was the moral that was "be on your guard / Up against the flatterers of the world, or backyard" (Chaucer, 231). This moral was made apparent the day the fox arrived in the garden. Again as we've observed before, Chanticleer allowed the fox to get close as

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he chose not to take the warning of his wish to heart. Very much closer to his meals the fox then began to spout the thing that could spell Chanticleers demise: flattery. Chanticleer being the most attractive and musical rooster on the land fell sufferer to the fox's phrase as he said thus, "Dear sir, I had not been even spying on you! Truly I came to do no other thing / Than simply to lie and listen to you sing. You might have as merry a tone as God has goven / To any angel in the courts of Heaven; / Compared to that you add a musical sense as strong / As got Boethius who was simply skilled in songs Oh, for charity of center, / Is it possible to not emulate your sire and sing?" (Chaucer, 227). And as do a lot of men in our day and age fall sufferer to such lovely words, so performed Chanticleer who was used by at the throat by the fox the second he attempted to win over him with a wonderful coo. Truly the theme of anguish was present as it seemed that the cock's day of singing were over, however true irony was later seen by the end of the story; as luck would have it Chanticleer was still alive in the fox's oral cavity and was able to only free himself with similar flattery.

Through Chanticleers mishaps and close come across with fatality we can see an illustration of the theme of real human suffering coated by the happenings that took place. However, like all things read from a booklet of tales, the storyline was that, a tale. One designed to alert us of the reason why for our fighting clearly once we saw nothing but misery and hurting almost take Chanticleers life. It's the theme of human fighting and the moral of this tale that people should try heart, and that might be "be alert / Up against the flatterers of the world, or yard" (Chaucer, 231).

Work Cited

Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Nun's Priest's Story. " The Canterbury Tales. Penguin Classics ed.

Trans. Nevil, Coghill. 1951. NY: Penguin Group, 2003, internet pages 216-231. Print.

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