Learn how to write a technical report

Head bursting because you have to write a technical report? Don’t worry, to flaunt a cliché there is a first time for everything and if it’s not a pleasurable pursuit it is usually the hardest one. However, by the time you have read this article you will have a good idea of how to write a technical report. You will learn:

 

How it works

Student places an order

Student places an order

Writers make their offers

Writers make their offers

Student Hires a WRITER

Student Hires a WRITER

THE WRITER GETS TO WORK

THE WRITER GETS TO WORK

Price calculator
We've got the best prices, check out yourself!
Deadline
Specify when you would like to receive the paper from your writer. Make sure you leave a few more days if you need the paper revised. You'll get 20 more warranty days to request any revisions, for free.
Pages
Words
+
Our Price
Competitors' price is calculated using statistical data on writers' offers on Studybay
Competitors' price
We've gathered and analyzed the data on average prices offered by competing websites
£ 0 Best Price!
£ 0

Please remember that the steps set out in this article are guidelines for you to refer to and it is essential that you get the precise requirements for your specific course; that is your first step when you are learning how to write a technical report.

At this stage, you will have done all your background reading, your experiments or worked through your technical research problems and reached your conclusions. In essence, the writing stage is clarifying and ordering it all so it makes clear sense to anyone that reads it. This can seem like a tall order and that is why planning is one of the most important stages of writing the report. The more time you put into this the better it will be for you because it will make everything else easier along the line. It is often a lack of planning that is the root cause of problems when writing a technical report or dissertation.

First of all, you need to collect all your information together. If at this point it seems a bit overwhelming, don’t worry because once you have organised it all, you will start to get a sense of clarity towards your report. Make sure that you have got all your lecture notes, laboratory handouts and extensive notes from your background reading. It is important that to accompany your notes for your background reading that you have specific details of any theories or scientific research that you are using. For instance, if you are using a theory from a journal article, it is essential that you note down: the title of the article and the author’s name; the name of the journal and the year of publication; also the volume number, issue number and page numbers. Likewise, if you are quoting from a book, you need to write: the book title and author; the publisher, the year of publication and which edition it is. This is essential because if you don’t follow this procedure and use someone else’s theory, you may be accused of plagiarism.

Write down a list of all your topics, ideas and theories. At this stage, it doesn’t have to be organised, you just need a full list. Once you have this you can start putting them into categories under topics. Can you see how a sense of logic is emerging? You can now order them into a sequence. At this point, you may wish to add headings and sub headings. The main objective here is to see a pattern forming that follows logical reasoning.

  • The first page is the title sheet. This is probably one of the last pages that you will do even though it comes first. The reason for this is that you will probably be working on your title right up to the end of your report. When you first write your title it will probably be long and clumsy. However, with constant work on it, it will become self-explanatory and concise. Be aware that you may also need to put the word count on the title page too.
  • Summary or Abstract. Depending on your specific department, you will either have a summary or abstract on the second page. Basically, this is an overview of your report. It needs to clarify exactly what your research question or experiment is. It needs to highlight the main features and it also needs to explain the results and conclusions. Fundamentally, someone that has never set eyes on your theory or experiment should be able to read this and understand exactly what technical or scientific research you have been conducting, how you progressed and what your results were. The difficult part of this is that it has to be, like the title, concise.
  • Contents sheet. This has to list all your chapters, headings, subheadings and page numbers. Basically, a reader needs to be able to look at this and immediately be able to go directly to the part of the report that interests them. For instance, if your department required a literature review and the reader was interested in your interpretation of a particular theory then by addressing your contents page they would be able to access the information immediately.
  • Introduction. This must introduce the research question clearly. It cannot be ambiguous or rambling. The examiner needs to be able to read this and instantly be able to recognize what your report entails. This section, like the title, is often written nearer to the end of the work because by the time you have written the rest of the report, you should have ultimate clarity as to what your experiment or technical problem entails and how you propose to solve it. Remember, also that the introduction is also a taster of your writing to lure the examiner in and make them interested to read more. Basically, it is as well to remember that although they have to read it all the way through come what may, it is better that they read it and enjoy it. Don’t think that you can rest on your technical or scientific skills and not be too bothered about the quality of the writing – if you want the best grades then the writing had to be excellent too.
  • The main body of the report. Basically, this is where you will have your main chapters that are divided into headings and sub headings. Some departments require a literature review where you will discuss the theories around the latest technical or scientific research connected to your project; other universities may not require this – this is why it is essential to check out exactly what you are supposed to do and how you need to present it. It is in this section that you will also be expected to explain which methodology you have used, describe your experiment or technical research and your results too.
  • Conclusions. This is simply a brief summing up of your main body. Don’t be tempted to paraphrase everything that has gone before. Be succinct.
  • References to anything you have cited. It is important to give full details of anything that has been mentioned or ideas that have been used. If you are unsure of how much detail to give, refer back to earlier in this article in the planning your report section; it gives in detail the specifics for both books and journals. If you have mentioned any websites, these also need to be referred to in detail.
  • Bibliography. This needs to include all the back ground reading that you have done. Again, any websites that you have used for your preliminary research should also be mentioned.
  • Acknowledgements. Here you can mention the main people that have helped you.

Remember that this is the first draft and that unless you show it to someone else, no-one is going to see it so you can relax. The first draft is the stage where most people get hit by procrastination. It’s true and it can be lethal because it can waste precious weeks and also make you feel like a furnace has erupted inside your head. Don’t worry, here’s what you need to do:

  • Get your plan in front of you.
  • Go straight to the main body, forget about the introduction for the time being and look at your first heading. Underneath it you should have some sub headings. Simply write about one small sub heading.
  • Don’t worry about spelling errors or grammatical mistakes just get the words down.
  • Relax.
  • Work through some more subheadings in the same manner.
  • Stop for fresh air breaks and lots of fluids.
  • Fill in some more subheadings.
  • Once you have actually got some subheadings filled in, make yourself a subheading timetable. Don’t do this before you have started to relax because it will make you more stressed. It should only be done once your sub conscious has registered that these subheadings are actually workable.
  • Continue in this manner until you have a first draft.

At this stage, you will have a first draft that will not be as tight and structured as your work needs to be. Don’t worry, this is what the editing stage is for. It is a common mistake that many students believe that editing is simply using spellcheck. It isn’t. Editing is revising a full piece so that it changes from a pouring your ideas out draft to professional piece of work.

  • Look at your research or theory; is it presented in a logical fashion? If not, go back over it and see what needs to be changed around or adapted.
  • Go through the work again and look for repetition. Have you written about a part of your experiment and then paraphrased it? If so, go through with a red pen and cross out all the repetition.
  • Reread your technical report and be totally honest – is it accurate and concise? This is one of the main criteria with a technical report and if it falls down in this aspect, it will not get a very good grade. This step is vital. Go through your report with a red pen and be vigilant for ambiguity. There is no room for it in this type of report. You can do this on the computer but it has been proven that when we print out our work and read it through this way, we often spot errors that may pass us by on the screen.
  • Okay, now that you’ve removed ambiguity, you have to go in search of clarity. Sometimes, students think that if they get rid of loose translation then they have finished editing. Unfortunately, this is not so especially in writing technical or scientific papers. There is a very fine distinction between a paragraph that is written loosely that can be misinterpreted and a paragraph that is not clearly written so that it cannot be understood at all. Can you see how you have to check for both of these situations in your writing? Read each paragraph through very carefully and ask yourself if it is absolutely clear what you mean?
  • Check for spelling and grammatical errors. If a report is littered with these it can be distracting to the examiner and they may mark you down.

Words are not always the best source when trying to describe aspects of a technical report and therefore other methods need to be used. These can include:

  • Graphs. A graph is a useful way to demonstrate data quickly and easily. It is often simpler to highlight statistics with a graph than using words. The reader can see at a glance what you are trying to convey. Therefore, when editing your report, ask yourself could a graph be inserted instead of using words. Make sure that it is clear to read and accurate.
  • Diagrams. Diagrams can be used to enhance the text. Draw them specifically for your report and place them either under or over the related text so that the reader can see the connection.
  • Tables. Before you use a table, consider if you could use a graph or pie chart first. Also, make sure that the table is clear and accurate. If the table is huge, you should consider creating an appendix and placing it there.
  • Mathematics. Only consider this if it is the most suitable way to get your information across. If it is a long and complicated equation that you need to display, you should create an appendix and place it there.

Hopefully, by this point you will feel fully confident and know how to write a technical report. However, if you are not or you feel ill or stressed then you may need some help to get yourself further along in your academic career. This is not a problem; all you need to do is contact us. We offer a full range of research and writing services. Furthermore, all the work that we do is original and goes through anti plagiarism software. Added to that, you can rest assured that we have a reputation for offering full confidentiality. This means that no-one will ever know that you have used us.

Our services include:

  • Report writing.
  • Essay writing.
  • Dissertation work.
  • Letter writing.
  • Speech writing.
  • Proof reading.
  • Editing.
  • Book reports.

What is Studybay.com

  • 15+ years experience in academic paper writing assistance
  • 100% original writing
  • 97% customer rating
  • 24/7 FREE customer support via phone and email
  • Flexible discount policy
  • VIP services available
  • All subjects available

Today’s site activity

Preparing orders
Preparing orders
0
Completed orders
Completed orders
0
Active writers
Active writers
11856
Proofreaders
Proofreaders
148
Discount programs available for customers
Discount programs available for customers
6
Customer reviews
Customer reviews
0
Operators online
Operators online
12

What we can offer

FREE features in every order

free

Total Savings: $65

  • Outline$5
  • Amendments*$30
  • Title Page$5
  • Bibliography$15
  • Formatting$10

Academic style

All formats are available

Our Discounts

Special price $5 /page

Get help with any kind of assignment - from a high school essay to a PhD dissertation

Get help with any kind of assignment

Price calculator
We've got the best prices, check out yourself!
Deadline
Pages Words
Our Price
£0
Competitors' price
£0