Writing a Kobe earthquake case study

If you are asked to write a Kobe earthquake case study, you need to do some very thorough research into the event. Use several sources and cross check the information they contain. Check to find out if you can use Wikipedia as sometimes you are told not to because the information given may not be totally reliable. However, you should read the article and follow the references given at the end of it. These can be very useful for your research.

You will quickly realise that the Kobe earthquake is actually called the Great Hanshin earthquake, or, to give it its full name in Japanese, Hanshin-Awaji Daishinsai the “Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster.”

 

Following the quake, fires swept the area, so help outside was needed from outside Kobe to extinguish them. People also formed bucket brigades to combat the flames.

How it works

Student places an order

Student places an order

Writers make their offers

Writers make their offers

Student Hires a WRITER

Student Hires a WRITER

THE WRITER GETS TO WORK

THE WRITER GETS TO WORK

Price calculator
We've got the best prices, check out yourself!
Deadline
Specify when you would like to receive the paper from your writer. Make sure you leave a few more days if you need the paper revised. You'll get 20 more warranty days to request any revisions, for free.
Pages
Words
+
Our Price
Competitors' price is calculated using statistical data on writers' offers on Studybay
Competitors' price
We've gathered and analyzed the data on average prices offered by competing websites
£ 0 Best Price!
£ 0

For all case studies you need to write you should remember to address the following questions: -

  • What is the event you are writing about?
  • When did it occur?
  • Where was its location?
  • Why did it occur?
  • Who was involved or affected by it?

For this particular case study, you could also mention what the effects were for the wider Japanese society, and for the world in general. For example, the lax building codes and an inadequate early warning system were criticised, and so these issues were rectified following the earthquake.

So, let’s think about the first question and its answer. Then we can explore the answers to the other questions.

1) The event was the Kobe earthquake, and you should also supply the alternative names for it in Japanese and the English translation. Mention precisely what happened and present some facts and figures, such as: -

  • It registered at 7.3 on the Richter scale.
  • It continued for 20 seconds.
  • Its epicentre was the island of Awaji located, to the east of the Inland Sea. The island lies just off the coast near Kobe (hence the name). The focus of the quake was approximately 10 miles, or 16 kilometres, below the surface of the Earth.
  • The death toll was estimated at 6,400.
  • 40,000 people were injured.
  • After the quake 300,000 became homeless.
  • More than 240,000 homes were damaged.
  • Millions of homes were left without electricity and water.
  • It was the worst earthquake Japan had experienced since the one that struck Japan in 1923. That was called the Great Kanto earthquake or the Tokyo-Yokohama earthquake. That one left an estimated 140,000 dead.
  • The damage, in total was estimated at $200 billion dollars (US).

2) As for when it occurred, the date was the 17th January 1995. It struck at 5.46 am and was one of the biggest earthquakes that Japan had experienced.

3) It was located in the Hyōgo prefecture, which is in the west-central district of Honshu.

This is a densely populated area. In fact, it is home to more than 11 million people. It is the second largest urban area in Japan.

Japan is located within the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire.’

4) It occurred because of the movement of the tectonic plates that lie under the sea.

5) The people who lived in the area were adversely affected by the quake.

The Kobe earthquake demonstrated that the infrastructure was not as safe as it was supposed to be. In Japan buildings were thought to be earthquake-proof. However, this proved not to be the case, and railway lines, elevated highways and some port facilities in Kobe were destroyed. Luckily, many of the buildings that had been constructed in accordance with new building codes survived. However, the older, wooden-framed buildings simply collapsed. Parts of the Hanshin Expressway, which links Kobe with Osaka collapsed, with much damage being caused. The transport system was inoperative, and this highlighted the fact that Japan was not prepared for such a disaster. The Japanese government initially refused foreign aid and was severely criticised for this and its slow response.

In the aftermath of the Kobe earthquake all construction was made to withstand earthquakes. The government ensured that its response to disasters would be quicker and it revised its response policies. A transport system for use in emergencies was devised, and shelters were constructed, and evacuation procedures were put in place in Kobe.

Japan suffered a further disaster in on the 11th of March 2011 when 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck north-eastern Honshu. This is known as the Great Tōhoku earthquake or alternatively, the Great Sendai Earthquake. It triggered a tsunami which in turn was responsible for a major accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Ōkuma.

Kobe’s leaders have shared their subsequent knowledge regarding how to deal with the aftermath of a disaster with the rest of the world, in the hope that this will help prevent and help to deal with other future disasters.

Hopefully you will now be able to write your own Kobe earthquake case study, but if you are still not confident about your ability to do this, contact us. We provide people with full, professional writing services which are completely confidential. We can simply edit and proofread your case study (or any other writing task type) or we can write the whole case study for you. Contact us now for more information about our services.

What is Studybay.com

  • 15+ years experience in academic paper writing assistance
  • 100% original writing
  • 97% customer rating
  • 24/7 FREE customer support via phone and email
  • Flexible discount policy
  • VIP services available
  • All subjects available

Today’s site activity

Preparing orders
Preparing orders
3
Completed orders
Completed orders
0
Active writers
Active writers
5690
Proofreaders
Proofreaders
56
Discount programs available for customers
Discount programs available for customers
6
Customer reviews
Customer reviews
0
Operators online
Operators online
11

What we can offer

FREE features in every order

free

Total Savings: £65

  • Outline£5
  • Amendments*£30
  • Title Page£5
  • Bibliography£15
  • Formatting£10

Format

All formats are available

Our Discounts

Special price £5 /page

Get help with any kind of assignment - from a high school essay to a PhD dissertation

Get help with any kind of assignment