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Alan Turing's Life, Efforts, and Legacy

Our daily lives are filled with technology. We wake up on time because of the alarms we place on our phone. We can find the quickest route available to reach where we need to go using the GPS. We are able to work everywhere and if we want, using our portable notebooks. Sometimes we have no idea how to spell a term, or know the answer to a question, and we are able to search it up on Google and find a remedy. Technology makes our lives easier. It would be hard to live in a world with no conveniences we've today. We owe a lot of our modern developments to Alan Turing, one of the very most prominent computer researchers in the first 1900s. Turing created the concept of a Universal Turing machine, what is known as a computer today. Additionally, Turing also led the beliefs to artificial cleverness, much of what our hottest solutions incorporate nowadays. While he didn't get to see the actual and great reality of his concepts today, his vision created a lasting legacy that future computer researchers continue to build on and explore.

Alan Mathison Turing was born on June 23, 1912 in Paddington, London (Hodges). Turing's daddy, Julius Mathison Turing, dished up the British isles Indian Civil Service where he previously met Turing's mom, Ethel Sara Stoney, who was the child of the chief railway engineer in the Madras Presidency (Hodges). Alan Turing also possessed an older brother, John Turing. Turing was raised in the upper-middle-class, and did not see his parents much (Hodges). Accordingly, he was delivered to Sherborne College, a boarding college. At Sherborne Institution, Turing centered on mathematics and technology, studying ahead of what the institution expected the students to learn (Hodges). In his classes, Turing achieved Christopher Morcom, which he found to be the same peer in his fascination with mathematics and research (Hodges). Unfortunately, 24 months after they experienced met, Morcom passed on, which caused great injury for Turing (Hodges).

After his best friend's death, Turing visited King's University in Cambridge, where in fact the two designed to go mutually before Morcom's untimely loss of life (Hodges). At King's College or university, he was more inspired to endeavor in his studies and research alternatively than at Sherborne (Hodges). Turing was well read in key points of mathematics and quantum technicians (Hodges). Turing studied and was influenced works by other mathematicians and scientists such as von Neumann and A. S. Eddington (Hodges). Turing was given a Fellowship of King's University in 1935 (Hodges). A calendar year later, he received a Smith's Award for his research on possibility theory (Hodges).

While going to King's School, Alan Turing was involved with the Anti-war motion of 1933, although he had not been deeply into politics (Hodges). The Anti-war motion that Turing was associated with was in between the two world wars. Inside the 1930s, people rebelled against further warfare due to consequences of the First World Warfare. As the First World Warfare triggered great casualties and fighting, people resisted preventing in future wars, and advocated for tranquility instead. The Anti-war movement resulted in new reason of thoughts such as Marxism and pacifism, which Turing did not participate in (Hodges).

The Second World Conflict broke out in 1939 and ended soon 6 years after. During that time, Turing proved helpful in solution as a cryptographer for the United kingdom Brains, among other top cryptographers (Hodges). Finally, his quest was to crack Germany's Enigma cipher, the most complex cipher at its time, which was the main element to being able to access important German soldiers' plan. Turing been able the impossible and cracked the code. By doing so, he preserved many Allied lives. Turing was hugely responsible for the results of the conflict. While it is not verified, Winston Churchill supposedly said that Turing made the solo biggest contribution to Allied triumph in the battle against Nazi Germany (Schilling). Turing's engagement with the next World War and dealing with the British administration allowed him to acquire funding and therefore affected him to work on several other projects.

Turing got many great contributions during the Second World War. In order to split the Enigma, Turing and his colleague Gordon Welchman created the Bombe, which deciphers the encrypted information from the Enigma sent by the Germans (IWM). Before the invention of the Bombe, the Enigma could have been impossible to crack, as the encryption method was modified daily. Therefore, the Bombe considerably reduced the workload necessary to crack the Enigma, and allowed the United kingdom to acquire German's intelligence that was a huge advantage. Turing shared his use other allied countries, which led them to work on different variations of the Bombe (IWM).

One of Turing's best efforts is the Universal Turing Machine. Turing started working on it in 1936 prior to the Second World War, and sustained to work on it after the warfare (IWM). Turing first experienced the idea of a Turing machine, a machine that is with the capacity of performing a computational process. There are numerous possible tasks that a Turing Machine can compute, thus there are infinite possibilities of Turing machines (Hodges). Alan Turing conceptualized the Universal Turing machine, which would perform any activity one Turing machine would be able to do (Hodges). Think of a Turing machine as a function over a calculator, such as adding or subtracting. The Common Turing machine is the calculator itself, which includes many functions. The General Turing machine was an individual machine that possessed the actual to do many jobs.

Many computer scientists may claim Alan Turing is the inventor of the first modern computer. His notion of the General Turing machine is the substance of the modern computer. Pcs today have many applications, like a calculator, a web browser, or a music player. These applications could be independent machines, however they are encapsulated into one machine, which is the thought of the Common Turing machine in mind. Without Turing's ingenious concept, we may not have the present day computer today.

Another big contribution by Alan Turing is the Turing Test. The Turing Test originates from Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence paper written in 1950 (Hodges). Turing created a hypothesis a Turing machine can be created to have intelligence. Regarding to John M. Kowalik, "The test contains a person requesting questions via keyboard to both a person and a smart machine. He assumed that if the individual could not tell the machine apart from the person after an acceptable amount of time, the device was somewhat wise. " The Turing Test troubles the idea of a smart machine, or at least convince a individual it has brains.

Turing has kept a great legacy for the progress of computer knowledge. Based on his principles of the General Turing machine, later computer scientists were inspired computational machines that could perform multiple jobs. The idea of a General Turing machine hasn't improved, but its features have certainly improved as technology evolves. From the clunky desktops in the late 1900s, to the rail thin laptops we have today, they were all influenced by Turing's concept of the General Turing machine. Today, computer experts are still checking out the infinite possibilities of the functionalities of any computer, as Turing theorized.

The Turing Test spawned a new field of review in computer technology. Turing still left future computer researchers the ambitious notion of artificial intelligence. Though it was not achieved in his lifetime, today we have many applications of man-made intelligence that are based on the fundamental idea of the Turing Test. Autos that can autonomously drive, Siri on the iPhone, and Yahoo search are examples of artificially intellect led by the legacy of Turing. Scholars remain finding ways to apply artificial intelligence into our interactions in lifestyle. What Turing has began blossomed into a fresh form of technology that has changed the way we cooperate with machines.

In bottom line, Alan Turing deserves much gratitude for his works in his life time. Turing's technology of the Bombe allowed the British to decipher the Enigma and resulted in triumph for the Allied pushes. The Universal Turing machine was probably the first idea of the modern computer. The Turing Test led to talk and future work by computer scientists in artificial intellect. Turing possessed a grand eye-sight for how machines could help us in the foreseeable future. By following his legacy, computer experts continue to build on the foundation that his ideas had organized. Even though technology progress further, Turing's eyesight will never be overlooked. His ideas have transcended in new forms. Many research fiction novels, philosophy, and movies can be accredited to Turing's principles. It is unfortunate that his contributions weren't greatly acknowledged in his own life time as it is today. Turing confronted many adversities with regulators concerning his sexuality with men, which was shunned middle-1900s in Britain (Hodges). Regrettably, Turing passed away on June 8, 1954, due to cyanide poisoning, which was thought to be suicide (Hodges). Despite the difficulties in his life, Turing still fathered many groundbreaking ideas in computer technology. Turing leaves us behind with his legacy, in promising hope for a larger future.

References

Hodges, Andrew. "Alan Turing - a Short Biography. " Alan Turing - a Short Biography. Turing. org. uk, 1995. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

Hodges, Andrew. "The Alan Turing Internet Scrapbook. " Alan Turing Scrapbook - Turing Test. N. p. , n. d. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

"How Alan Turing Cracked The Enigma Code. " Imperial Warfare Museums. N. p. , 21 Jan. 2015. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

Kowalik, John M. "Alan Turing. " N. p. , 1995. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

Schilling, Johnathan. "Churchill: Turing Made the Solitary Biggest Contribution to Allied Success. " The Churchill Centre. The International Churchill World, n. d. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

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