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Merchant Of Venice PLUS THE Idea Of Aristotle Idea Essay

Every specific perceives the planet by having a different pair of eyes. This results countless worldviews and interpretations of reality. Moral philosophies happen that contradict other people's ways of living and therefore cause numerous hardships. Considering that ethics plays an intrinsic role running a business, the entire business community contains clashing views and ideologies. In Shakespeare's play "The Vendor of Venice, " three business ideologies come up from the takes on main characters: Antonio, Bassanio, and Shylock. A short summary of the story supplies enough information to draw certain conclusions about these ideologies, and shows a connection between happenings in the Merchant of Venice and the idea of Aristotle.

Among the three, Antonio possessed the most prosperity. Antonio hates Jews and therefore spits on Shylocks face. In addition, Antonio competes with Shylock's money financing business by lending money at zero interest. After some time, however, Antonio must borrow money from Shylock. Shylock agrees but proposes a fascinating condition for the loan: if Antonio defaults on the loan, he permits Shylock to take off a pound of his flesh.

Portia, a lovely woman that numerous men want to marry, is involved in an interesting situation as well. Among three boxes of gold, silver, and lead keep a family portrait of Portia. Men wanting to marry Portia select a pack, but if it does not contain the portrait of Portia, they may be to remain sole forever. The Prince of Morocco makes the first make an effort. He idolizes money and consequently picks the platinum chest. Unfortunately, not all that glitters is precious metal and the Prince must continue to be single forever. The Prince of Arragon chooses the silver chest and, like the first contestant, must remain single forever. Bassanio makes the previous attempt and selects the lead casket. In the meantime, Antonio receives word that his ships are lost at sea. Shylock manages to get Antonio arrested and brought prior to the court for defaulting on the connection.

After Portia and Bassanio get wedded, Bassanio gets a letter stating that Antonio defaulted on the loan. Bassanio and Gratiano go back to Venice with money from Portia, and try to save Antonio by paying Shylock back again. Secretly, Portia directs her servant to talk to Portia's cousin Bellario. Shylock declines Bassanio's offer of 6, 000 ducats, double the amount of the loan. He wants his pound of flesh from Antonio. Portia, as "Balthazar, " asks Shylock showing mercy in an elegant talk, but Shylock declines that as well. Shylock remains his demand for the pound of flesh from Antonio. Next, Portia points out a flaw in the deal. The contract only allows Shylock to eliminate the flesh, however, not the blood vessels of Antonio. Portia declares that if Shylock sheds some of Antonio's blood, Shylock will perish. Shylock encounters the problem where he must ask the Duke for mercy, and the Duke dismisses Shylocks loss of life sentence.

Antonio, Shylock, and Bassanio may actually view business in different ways than one another, even though some similarities can be found as well. Antonio supports a dangerous view of business, while Shylock views it as a chance of following the notice of regulations and an opportunity to trap people. On the other hand, Bassanio requires a more average view of business, taking benefit of opportunities but sometimes holding again. Antonio exhibits characteristics that suggest he holds a risky view of business. For example, he bailed out Bassanio on numerous occasions. This prompted Bassanio to ask for the trip to see Portia. Antonio lent very much money that he needed to ask for financing from Shylock. This demonstrates a risk-taking quality and it appears easy to imagine Antonio risking most of his money on the currency markets. Antonio expresses this business ideology stating, "I pray you, good Bassanio, i want to know it, Of course, if it stand, as you yourself still do, Within the eye of honour, be assured My tote, my person, my extremest means, Rest all unlocked to your occasions. " Bassanio views business as an possibility to take good thing about other people's be employed by his own pleasure. However, there's a limit to his madness. As Antonio plays risky games offering his money away, Bassanio plays the other end of the range receiving the prize. At first, it seems Bassanio simply uses Antonio. However, Bassanio restrains himself when Antonio's life is at risk. After Shylock expresses the terms of the relationship, Bassanio exclaims, "You shall not seal to such a bond for me personally. I'll alternatively dwell in my need. " Business plays an interesting role for Shylock given his Jewish worldview. Jews, sticking with Old Testament custom, seek to enforce the letter of the law. They treat this practice as a service to God. This becomes especially obvious when he inquires about the law during the courtroom session. Shylock says, "Is the fact regulations?" Business pacts, then, give Shylock a way to exhibit his moral worth while earning money at exactly the same time. Given these different views of business, it seems sensible any particular one man understands the type of business better than the others.

A combination of Shylock's view and Bassanio's view seem to express the type of business appropriately. Business should be rational, profitable, rather than interfere with spiritual values. Adopting a put together view allows one to express their spiritual values, earn cash, and still make logical decisions. For example, Shylock's view lends spiritual appearance through business. Bassanio's view lends rationality and the most success. He makes the most money getting it from Antonio, but halts when he hears the insane requirements of the relationship.

Shylock mentions to Antonio that he has little or nothing to gain by collecting the pound of flesh from him. This seems just like a trick to persuade Antonio into accepting the bond. If Shylock hates Christians, he has something to get by tricking Antonio. Shylock clues at this bias saying, "Would any of the stock of Barabas have been her husband rather than a Christian!" If Antonio gives the loan back, then all is well. If he defaults, however, Shylock gets to trim his flesh. Shylock would reap the benefits of this since he hates Christians, which Antonio happens to be.

Aristotle creates about virtue in his famous treatise Nicomachean Ethics. He contends two types of virtue exist. Intellectual virtues occur from leaning, whereas moral virtue comes from the practice of certain behaviors. Portia possesses intellectual virtue as well as moral virtue that allow her to stay the dispute. A few of Portia's virtues include courage and wit. She shows great courage taking a stand disguised in courtroom. Her wit allows her to save lots of Antonio by finding the problem with the agreement. Courage is a moral virtue, so she acquires it by rehearsing courageous acts. Alternatively, wit can be an intellectual virtue attained by learning. Shakespeare possibly makes a decision to have the case resolved by a female because of the virtues they commonly maintain. Moreover, he might have had the situation established in a court of law since it relates to the Jews religious values. Overall, the play has numerous elements related to virtue and features all of the ways people view the type of business.

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